The Dance Recital (Part 2).

The Dance Recital (Part 2)

2 thoughts on “The Dance Recital (Part 2).

  1. Nice one! It has a bit more liveliness than the previous one of the same event. It’s great to see folks just enjoy themselves.

    May I be a drag for a minute? I left a comment on the previous b&w shot about texture and what not. Well, I found a digital b&w shot which has a nice richness to it and I’m thinking that if it can be done with one digital camera, it can be done with another:

    Note the high contrast (my favourite treatment of b&w images), but note more subtly the richness of the image. So – what would you do, if you were inclined, to get that richness? We’ll see what that photographer says about it.

    • Photography is created with light. Different light = different photograph. This applies even when you are photographing the same subject. Monet understood this when he painted, for example, haystacks under varying light:

      “Although the mundane subject was constant throughout this series, the underlying theme may be seen as the transience of light. This concept enabled him to use repetition to show nuances of perception as seasons, time of day, and weather changes. The constant subject provided the basis from which comparisons could be made in changes of light across this nuanced series… These paintings made Monet the first painter to paint such a large quantity of pictures of the same subject matter differentiated by light, weather, atmosphere and perspective.”
      —Wikipedia, Haystacks (Monet) [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haystacks_%28Monet%29 ].

      One of the B&W images I posted recently has both ample contrast and tonality:

      But the lighting here was yet again different from the lighting on The Dance Recital stage, which was comprised of extremes: high intensity spotlights risking blown highlights + unlit portions of the stage/dancers producing a “crushing” of the blacks. Tonality suffers under these conditions.

      —Peter.

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