How I process B&W film (Part 2 of 3).

_

[For Part 1: Equipment Required, please click here.]

_

____________________________________________________

Part 2:

Preparing the Solutions.

____________________________________________________

_

Before you start processing your black-and-white film, you first need to prepare your…

(1) Developing

(2) Fixing

(3) final Washing

…solutions in the 3 Tupperware containers (mentioned in Part 1).   This is necessary because all of these solutions are bottled in a concentrated form and it is necessary to dilute them before using them.

_

[Tip :):  When you prepare each of these solutions for the first time, take a moment to mark the level of the final volume on your Tupperware containers.  By doing this, you will eliminate the need to measure the water amounts the next time you process film… all you will need to do is measure out the concentrated form of each solution and then just add water up to the marked level.]

_

______________________________

How to prepare the solutions.

1. Preparing the Developing Solution:

Add…

9cc of the Kodak HC-110 developer syrup (shown above)

+

the rest is tap water

for a total of 290 mL (10 oz).*

*this is the volume required to fill a single-reel Paterson tank.

_

_

2. Preparing the Fixing Solution:

Add…

72 cc of Ilford Rapid Fixer (shown above)

+

the rest is tap water

for a total of 290 mL.

_

_

3. Preparing the Final Wash Solution:

Add..

2 cc**  of Ilford Ilfotol Wetting Agent

+

the rest is distilled water**

for a total of 290 mL.

**you can estimate the amount of Wetting Agent by “eyeballing” (that’s what I do).

***this is the only step in which I use DISTILLED water (instead of tap water).

_

_

And that’s it!  Once you’ve prepared your 3 solutions, you are ready to start processing your film!

_

[Please click here for Part 3: Step-by-Step Film Processing.]

_Part 3 will provide step-by-step instructions on how I process B&W film.

_____________________________

Note:  The above method for preparing the Kodak HC-110 Developing Solution is referred to as “Dilution B” (the name is not so important, but you may encounter it).  I use this dilution to process the following B&W films:

_

Kodak Tri-X 400:

Ilford HP5 Plus 400:

_

These are classic films that are readily available, and each provides a different “mood” or “look”…

Kodak Tri-X 400 is known to be contrasty:

(please click on the image to view)

↑Kodak Tri-X 400.

_

…whereas Ilford HP5 Plus 400 is a little more dreamy:

(please click on the image to view)

↑Ilford HP5 Plus 400.

_

Others may take issue with my descriptions above but — no matter how they are characterized — the main point is that each film renders differently (though equally beautifully, to my eye).

_

[Tip :):  If processing your own B&W film for the first time, you may want to try Kodak Tri-X 400 first.  I find that it dries flat, whereas Ilford HP5 Plus 400 tends to curl, making it more difficult to work with if you subsequently want to try your hand at film scanning.]

_

_____________________________

Please donate to this site!

Please show your appreciation for this article!

If you’ve been helped by this article, or any of my other articles, please consider making a contribution to help me run Photographs by Peter.  Whether it’s $1, $5, or $10… it all helps.

Donate to this site (button)

This site is a labour of love, but any help I receive will help me devote more time to running it.

Thanks,

—Peter.

3 thoughts on “How I process B&W film (Part 2 of 3).

  1. [...] Part 2 will discuss how I prepare the Developing, Fixing, and (final) Washing solutions. [...]

  2. [...] In this final article, we put it all together, and I will list my step-by-step instructions on how to use the equipment discussed in Part 1 with the solutions prepared in Part 2. [...]

  3. [...] Part 2: Preparing the Solutions, please click [...]

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 641 other followers