Monthly Archives: August 2011

Moments of quiet contemplation.

It seems as if they happen rarely, but that is just an illusion.  They happen all the time, though truly, only for a moment.

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Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

Gelato (and sharpness of the Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2).

So, here’s our young lad eating some yummy gelato.

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↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

I am always in awe at what fast rangefinder lenses – in this case, the Konica Hexanon 60mm f/1.2 LTD – can do @ f/1.2.   Firstly, there is the subjective dream-like quality to the images.  Secondly, on the technical side, the sharpness wide open is remarkable.  Have a look at the 100% crop, where the focus is on the eye:

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↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2 (100% crop, no sharpening).

With all the difficulties in nailing focus manually, on a moving target at f/1.2 with a back-focusing lens, it’s this sort of result that inspires me to keep shooting.

Jump! And, some thoughts on image creation.

I often try to photograph in an unobtrusive manner because there is a natural rhythm to people and events to which the shutter release should be timed.  Snapping a photo at the wrong moment is like cutting against the grain, singing off key, or attempting to be somebody you’re not… it just doesn’t feel right.

When shots are planned – more likely than not – the smiles will be strained, the postures will be tense, the natural rhythm will be off.  This is of course unless you’re dealing with professional models, though even then introducing some spontaneity into the proceedings is a good thing.

Having written all this, I sometimes plan a shot, such as this one:

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↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

I asked C to jump.  That’s the planned part.  However, the act of jumping creates some fluidity because she’s concentrating on jumping and not posing.  Also, creating this image on the street allows for other elements to be introduced into the scene.  In this case, the passing couple wonderfully completes the composition – something for which I didn’t plan.

Lucky for me.

Do not enter.

An unknown figure in the distance.

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↑Leica MP and Voigtländer Nokton 40mm @ f/1.4.

Toronto skyline.

As it appeared at 17:43, August 25, 2011.

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Leica M9 and Leica 35mm Summarit @ f/2.5.

“Man” and his shadow.

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↑Leica MP and Voigtländer 40mm @ f/1.4.

Ruler of the beach.

Despite wielding a threatening plastic shovel, she is a benign ruler.

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Leica M9 and Leica 35mm Summarit @ f/2.5.

The fairytale.

The fairytale of childhood.  A kiss, and happy ever after.

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Leica M9 and Leica 75mm Summilux @ f/1.4.

Encounters with dogs.

He actually loves dogs.  Seriously.

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↑Leica M9 and Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH @ f/1.4.

↑Nikon D3S and Nikkor 105mm AI f/2.5.

↑Nikon D3S and Nikkor 105mm AI f/2.5.

Reading time, Part 2.

Even stuffed animals enjoy a good book.

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Leica M9 and Leica 50mm Summicron @ f/2.

Reading time, Part 1.

A quiet pause, amidst the chaos around them.

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Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

Union Station.

Union Station, Toronto.  Early in the morning.

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Leica MP and Leica 35mm Summicron.

Fall, on edge.

Continuing my recognition of the wonder-lens Nikkor-NOCT 58/1.2, I’m posting this image, taken last Autumn.

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Nikon D3S and Nikkor-NOCT 58mm @ f/1.2.

Something happening.

Posting photos with commentary – like I do on this blog – is new to me.  I used to just post photos, free of my interpretation, because I believed the images should stand on their own merit.  Interpretation would be left to the viewer.

I still believe that, but I’ve obviously softened my stance – hence this blog.

However, I’m posting this image, which I will leave hanging, unadorned by words (other than the title, “Something happening”).

I took it yesterday.  Today I’ll leave the details up to you.

I’m curious as to what you dream up.

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Leica M9 and Leica 35mm Summarit @ f/2.5.

Reverse-Narcissus.

Unaware of herself; life contradicting art.

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Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

“Love is better than anger…”

My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.

- Jack Layton (July 18, 1950 – August 22, 2011).

Chalk messages adorn the walls and pavement of Nathan Phillips Square, Toronto City Hall – an impromptu memorial in honour of Jack Layton.

If you wish to read more about Mr. Layton, see here.

RIP, dear Jack.

Both images taken with the Leica M9 and Leica 35mm Summarit.

She, and this little moment.

There are certain experiences in life that stay with you.  Most of the time, it’s the key ones that leave an imprint, but more often than not, the little moments – barely noticed at the time – are the ones that leave the indelible marks.

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Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

Writing his name.

Leaving an imprint in the sand, to disappear in the ebb-and-flow.

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Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

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